OCD

Everyone double checks things sometimes. For example, you might double check to make sure the stove or iron is turned off before leaving the house. But people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) feel the need to check things repeatedly, or have certain thoughts or perform routines and rituals over and over. The thoughts and rituals associated with OCD cause distress and get in the way of daily life. Learn more

Source: National Institute of Mental Health

Self Help Books for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)


 

The OCD Workbook: Your Guide to Breaking Free from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

 

If you have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), chances are that your persistent obsessive thoughts and time-consuming compulsions keep you from enjoying life to the fullest. But when you are in the habit of avoiding the things you fear, the idea of facing them head-on can feel frightening and overwhelming. This book can help.

The OCD Workbook has helped thousands of people with OCD break the bonds of troubling OCD symptoms and regain the hope of a productive life. Endorsed and used in hospitals and clinics the world over, this valuable resource is now fully revised and updated with the latest evidence-based approaches to understanding and managing OCD. It offers day-to-day coping strategies you can start using right away, along with proven-effective self-help techniques that can help you maintain your progress. The book also includes information for family members seeking to understand and support loved ones who suffer from this often baffling and frustrating disorder. Whether you suffer with OCD or a related disorder, such as body dysmorphic disorder or trichotillomania, let this new edition of The OCD Workbook be your guide on the path to recovery.

This new edition will help you: use self-assessment tools to identify your symptoms and their severity; create and implement a recovery strategy using cognitive behavioral self-help tools and techniques; learn about the most effective medications and medical treatments; find the right professional help and access needed support for your recovery; and maintain your progress and prevent future relapse.

 

 


 

Treating Your OCD with Exposure and Response (Ritual) Prevention: Workbook

 

An estimated 2-3% of the population is affected by obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This is a chronic condition that significantly affects daily functioning and quality of life. Many people with OCD would greatly benefit from receiving professional help to learn how to successfully manage this debilitating condition. This workbook aims to guide patients of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in how to best benefit from the treatment provided by their therapists. Treatments addressed in this publication include exposure and ritual (response) prevention, an effective, evidence-based treatment for this disorder.

Designed to be used in conjunction with its companion therapist guide titled Exposure and Ritual (Response) Prevention for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, this Workbook includes an exposure and ritual prevention treatment program which is broken down into 17 – 20 biweekly treatment sessions. During these sessions the patient will be gradually exposed to situations and places that trigger his or her OCD symptoms. The goal is that over time the OCD sufferer comes to realize that the things he or she fears will not necessarily occur if the rituals are not performed. Some exposures will be supervised by the therapist, but the workbook can help the patient to practice on their own at home in order to overcome some of the barriers and difficulties that are part and parcel of every treatment.

 

 


 

Stop Obsessing!: How to Overcome Your Obsessions and Compulsions (Revised Edition)

Are you tormented by extremely distressing thoughts or persistent worries? Compelled to wash your hands repeatedly? Driven to repeat or check certain numbers, words, or actions?

If you or someone you love suffers from these symptoms, you may be one of the millions of Americans who suffer from some form of obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD. Once considered almost untreatable, OCD is now known to be a highly treatable disorder using behavior therapy. In this newly revised edition of Stop Obsessing! Drs. Foa and Wilson, internationally renowned authorities on the treatment of anxiety disorders, share their scientifically based and clinically proven self-help program that has already allowed thousands of men and women with OCD to enjoy a life free from excessive worries and rituals.

You will discover:

  • Step-by-step programs for both mild and severe cases of OCD
  • The most effective ways to help you let go of your obsessions and gain control over your compulsions
  • New charts and fill-in guides to track progress and make exercises easier
  • Questionnaires for self-evaluation and in-depth understanding of your symptoms
  • Expert guidance for finding the best professional help 
  • The latest information about medications prescribed for OCD

 

 

OCD in Children


 

Freeing Your Child from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Powerful, Practical Program for Parents of Children and Adolescents

 

If you’re a parent of one of the more than one million children in this country with obsessive-compulsive disorder, you know how confusing, even frightening, the symptoms of OCD can be. You’re terrified of losing your child and angry about the havoc this disorder has wreaked in your family. More than anything, you want to be able to unlock the secrets of OCD, understand the cause of your child’s bizarre symptoms, and help your child break free of these disruptive, relentless thoughts and actions.

In her landmark book, Freeing Your Child from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Dr. Tamar E. Chansky creates a clear road map to understanding and overcoming OCD based on her successful practice treating hundreds of children and teenagers with this disorder. In Part I, Dr. Chansky “cracks the code” of the peculiar rules and customs of OCD — the handwashing, tapping, counting, and so forth. She explains how OCD is diagnosed, how to find the right therapist partner, and how to tailor treatment options to your child’s needs. You’ll learn how powerful behavioral modification can be and when medication can help. In Part II, you’ll learn how not to be pulled in by your child’s debilitating rituals at home or at school, how to talk to your child about the “brain tricks” OCD causes, and how to create an effective OCD battle plan that will empower your child to “boss back” the OCD monster. You’ll also learn how to cope in moments of crisis.

Part III offers specific advice for how to help your child handle the most common manifestations of OCD such as fears of contamination, checking, getting things “just right,” intrusive thoughts, and more. Part IV is an indispensable guide to additional resources, including books, videos, organizations, and websites.

Filled with Dr. Chansky’s compassionate advice and inspiring words from the many children with OCD whom she has helped, this book will be your lifeline. Battling back from OCD is hard work, but with the comprehensive, proven guidance in this book, you can help your child reclaim a life free from its grip.

 

 


 

Talking Back to OCD: The Program That Helps Kids and Teens Say “No Way” — and Parents Say “Way to Go”

 

No one wants to get rid of obsessive-compulsive disorder more than someone who has it. That’s why Talking Back to OCD puts kids and teens in charge. Dr. John March’s eight-step program has already helped thousands of young people show the disorder that it doesn’t call the shots–they do. This uniquely designed volume is really two books in one. Each chapter begins with a section that helps young readers zero in on specific problems and develop skills they can use to tune out obsessions and resist compulsions. Dr. March demonstrates how to:

  • Create a nickname for the illness to remember that OCD isn’t you
  • Make a symptom chart so you can plan when and where to start talking back
  • Break the disorder’s rules about the rituals

The pages that follow the instructions for kids and teens show their parents how to be supportive without getting in the way, including tips for:

  • Separating the OCD from your son or daughter
  • Asking your child’s permission to stop helping with rituals
  • Offering praise without imposing expectations

After just a few months’ practice, your family will get back to spending time on things that matter, instead of following pointless orders from the illness. The next time OCD butts in, you’ll be prepared to boss back–and show an unwelcome visitor to the door.

Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT) Self-Help Book of Merit

 

 


 

What to Do When Your Brain Gets Stuck: A Kid’s Guide to Overcoming OCD

 

This story guides children and their parents through the cognitive-behavioral techniques used to treat Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Revealing OCD in a whole new light, this interactive self-help book turns kids into super-sleuths who can recognize OCD’s tricks. Engaging examples, activities, and step-by-step instructions help children master the skills needed to break free from the sticky thoughts and urges of OCD, and live happier lives. This is the complete resource for educating, motivating, and empowering children to work toward change.